Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘How I do it’ Category

Henry House Hob was as excited as I was about my  new fiber combs. He couldn’t wait to try them out.

Picking his color

Picking his color

Henry took his time picking out the perfect color for his first combing experience. “It’s almost fall,” said Henry. “I want to do orange so you can make me a pumpkin.” This alpaca fiber had already been washed and dyed. The combing helps remove organic matter, short second cuts of fiber, and arranges the fibers nicely.

Lashing on

Lashing on

Henry got a small amount of fiber to start lashing on so he could start combing. “To lash on,” Henry explained, “you carefully swing the fiber on to the tines, pull away, and do it again until the comb has enough fiber to get going.”

 

Ready to begin

Ready to begin

Here is Henry, all ready to begin the actual combing.

Combing away

Combing away

Henry started combing the fiber. He was careful not to get the tines tangled up while he was working. “This fiber is already pretty clean.” observed Henry, “I don’t think it will take much combing.” I told Henry that he was right. This fiber did not need to much combing. When the fiber has a lot of organic matter in it, it needs combed a lot, moving the fiber back and forth between the combs.

Nicely Combed

Nicely Combed

This fiber is nicely combed. It is time to pull it off of the comb.

Pulling off the first bit of fiber

Pulling off the first bit of fiber

Henry gently pulled on the tips of the combed fiber. Off came a thin section of clean, straight fibers. “There is still more to pull off,” announced Henry. He was right. Several small layers of fiber get pulled off the comb.

Left over fiber

Left over fiber

Henry got all the long fibers carefully removed from the comb. “This fiber needs to go in a separate pile.” Henry informed me. “It can be used to make the insides of your projects.”

Fiber from the first comb

Fiber from the first comb

“Look!” exclaimed Henry, “Look how much fiber I got with just the first go.” Henry had done a very good job, but there was still more to do. The fiber had to be pulled from the other comb and the whole process started again until all of Henry’s batch of fiber was finished. It is nice to have such a helpful House Hob around our home. I’ll tell you a little secret though, Henry was a bit upset by the mess on the floor when the combing was done. He said it was a good thing that we didn’t do our combing on the carpet. There was quite few weed bits, as well as stray fibers. “That could have caused problems with the vacuum!” Lectured Henry as he went to get the broom.

I hope that you enjoyed Henry’s adventures in combing. You can see more of my creations on my web page. It  also has links to my facebook page and Etsy store.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Last time the slerks put together the log planter and filled it with soil. It was time for the really fun part.

Flowers

Flowers

The slerks were very excited to check out the flowers we bought for the planter. We used Marigolds, Verbena, Petunias, Alyssum,  and Geraniums.

Checking Out the Flowers

Checking Out the Flowers

They looked closely to be sure we had picked out perfect flowers.

Watering

Watering

It is important to water the plants in their pots before planting. This slerk helped out with the watering.

Decide where to put the plant

Decide where to put the plant

Here is a slerk deciding where to put the next plant.

Dig a hole

Dig a hole

Then a hole has to be dug for planting.

vacation 193

Remove the plant from the pot

Slide the plant out of the pot gently.

vacation 191

Slerks like teasing the roots a bit to loosen them before planting in the prepared hole. The plant needs tucked in firmly, but not too hard.

Admire your work

Admire your work

The slerks are admiring their hard work after the new plants were watered again.

 

I hope that you enjoyed the slerks’ garden adventure. You can see more of my work here Woodland Whimsy or here Woodland Whimsy Facebook.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

We got all the new slerks back to the house and settled in. The next day it was time to get started on the project with the hollow logs. We made a planter out of them. First the logs were cut to the length that we wanted. The slerks helped out with the measuring, but I was busy doing something else, so I wasn’t there to take photos.

Ready to help

Ready to help

The slerks all lined up on the porch rail, ready to help out.

All arranged

All arranged

I found a good spot for the logs, and the slerks helped me arrange them in an attractive fashion.

Soil pile

Soil pile

My father in law has a pile of great soil to use in garden projects. We were going to need some.

Shoveling

Shoveling

It is really difficult to help with the shoveling when you are as small as a slerk, but they sure tried to help.

Pushing the wheel barrow

Pushing the wheel barrow

This slerk is helping to push the wheel barrow around to where the logs were.

Helping

Helping

Even though they were really to small to help, they sure gave it their best shot. The logs were filled most of the way with this soil.

Adding amendment

Adding amendment

The slerks were able to help add some compost and mix it in to the top six inches or so.

Please join us on Monday when the slerks help plant beautiful things in the new log planter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

We decided that Woodland Whimsy should have hats. Or at least, try to make hats. I think that the hat design turned out well. There was just one little glitch. If one is going to sell hats, one must have a way to display them. I found a styrofoam head at Goodwill. It was a bit beat up, but I knew just the mushroom to help me out with the job.

Mortimer examines the mannequin

Mortimer examines the mannequin

“Oh my!” exclaimed Mortimer, “This will never do. Let us see it with the hat.”

Adding the hat

Adding the hat

“This is much to boring. We must do something better. I have just the thing.”

Dotted tissue paper

Dotted tissue paper

“This! This is what we need to make our girl beautiful and exciting.” Mortimer draped the tissue paper over the mannequin.

Tearing off the straight edges

Tearing off the straight edges

“First, we must tear off the straight edges,” instructed Mortimer. “The straight bits do not blend well.”

Tearing it up

Tearing it up

“Now we must tear the paper into bits.”

Pile of paper bits

Pile of paper bits

Mortimer tore up the tissue paper to get it ready to apply to the mannequin.

Other supplies

Other supplies

Mortimer found some Mod Podge in my craft room. “We can use this since you have it. A mixture of glue and water will work just as well.” Mortimer likes to be thrifty.

Getting started

Getting started

“Brush on a little glue, add the paper, and brush glue over the top,” instructed Mortimer.

Further instruction

Further instruction

“Use smaller pieces of paper for curves. Try to brush out as many wrinkles as possible.”

Drying

Drying

“Ah! She is finished. Now we must wait for the glue to dry.”

Hat test

Hat test

“See how much better she looks!” cried Mortimer. “Just a few finishing touches remain.”

Ready for the show

Ready for the show

“She is so beautiful. She must have a name,” mused Mortimer. “Readers out there, Do you have any name suggestions? If you do, Please leave them in the comments.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Happy Spring! It is windy and pretty cold here at Woodland Whimsy this first morning of spring. Happily, we’ve had a couple of weeks of lovely spring like weather that allowed us to have our barbeque on St. Patrick’s Day. Today we’ll see how it all turned out.

Barbeque Sauce

Barbeque Sauce

The ribs are almost completely done cooking. It’s time for Gilbert to add the barbeque sauce.

Applying the sauce

Applying the sauce

“It is important to wait until the end so the sauce doesn’t burn.” explained Gilbert.

Veggie Kabobs

Veggie Kabobs

Gilbert put the vegetable kabobs on the grill while the barbeque sauce cooked into the meat. “You have to have some balance in your diet. I love vegetables.”

Cutting up the ribs

Cutting up the ribs

Gilbert helped cut the ribs up for easy serving.

crafts 796

Dinner is served

“Look at all the yummy food!” said Gilbert happily.

First serving

First serving

“This looks really good, but I’m going to want more food than this.” giggled Gilbert.

Full!

Full!

I have to tell you that I couldn’t believe how much Gilbert ate. He didn’t help with clean up, he just fell asleep next to his plate after this photo was taken.

I hope you like Gilbert. You can see more of my work at www.woodlandwhimsy.com it has links to all my other pages.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Gilbert went to my mom’s farm with me on Saturday to help plant some trees and repair some critter pens. Sadly, we were way too busy to get photos taken. So Gilbert helped us grill our awesome dinner on Sunday. He reminded me that photos are important if I want to blog about something. I know corned beef would have been a bit more traditional as a Saint Patrick’s Day dinner, but we grilled ribs and veggie kabobs instead.

Seasoning

Seasoning

The first step in really great ribs is to season the meat. We did it the easy way this time and used a prepared seasoning. We often make our own.

Wrapped in foil

Wrapped in foil

Then it needs to be wrapped in foil.

Needs more

Needs more

“Hey!” exclaimed Gilbert, “I need some more foil.” The ribs need to be completely covered with the foil.

All covered

All covered

“That’s better.” said Gilbert in a satisfied voice. “Now we need to put them in the refrigerator until closer to time to cook.” Into the ‘fridge the ribs go. They rest in the refrigerator until about an hour before cooking.

On the Grill

On the Grill

Gilbert helped put the foil wrapped ribs on the grill. “Make sure the grill is on low,” advised Gilbert. “We don’t want to burn them.” The ribs grill on low for an hour or so.

Off with the foil

Off with the foil

After the ribs had grilled for a bit over an hour, Gilbert took off the foil and put the ribs directly on the grill.

No more foil

No more foil

The ribs cook directly on the grill (still on low) until the start to feel stiff when you pick them up with the tongs.

Ready for sauce

Ready for sauce

“They are ready for barbeque sauce! Let’s get it put on.” urged Gilbert.

Finishing up and the very best part, eating, will be featured in the next blog post. As always, you can see more of my work on my web page(which links to my other pages) www.woodlandwhimsy.com

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Happy Monday! Today I will be showing  you how I make my little mushrooms. Please give me feedback and let me know if the directions are easy enough to follow.

There are some basic things to remember any time you are needle felting. Always be very careful of your fingers. The needles are very sharp. Always jab the needle straight in and out. If you change the angle while you are felting, you run the risk of breaking your needle.

Supplies

Supplies needed for the project

These are the supplies that I used for this project: undyed alpaca fiber for the core, two colors of hand dyed alpaca fiber, a 38 triangle felting needle, and a foam pad on which to felt.

starting the stem

Roll tightly

Take the fiber that will be used for the stem and roll it as tightly as you can into a tube shape. The tighter you roll it, the faster it will be to felt.

begin

Beginning the stem

Begin felting half of the stem into a nice even tube.

stem top

Top of stem

When you have finished the step, your stem should look like this. The part that has been felted should be firm, but not hard when squeezed. Begin felting the bottom half of the stem. Turn the stem felted side down and felt the bottom of the stem. This part should be wider than the top as it will make your mushroom more stable. After you have felted the bottom, start felting in the sides to form a nice base for your mushroom. Make sure that the bottom is as flat as possible.

stem core

Ready for color

Pulling the fiber out in thinnish sheets, begin to cover the stem with the color you have chosen for it. Continue to layer fiber on until the stem is well covered leaving loose fibers at the top to attach to the mushroom cap.

Stem with color

Stem ready to go

This is what the stem should look like when it is ready to be attached. If you have too much fiber at the top, you can pull some of it off. You want enough to attach firmly to that cap, but not so much that it will be bulky.

Starting the cap

Starting the cap

Form the fiber for the cap into a ball with fiber left loose at the bottom. Felt the top part of the cap firmly.

Top of cap

Top of cap

Turn the cap over to felt the bottom part of the center of the cap.

Bottom of cap

Beginning the lower part of the cap

Felt the loose fibers creating a nice shape for your mushroom cap. This part can take quite a while. I haven’t found a way to compress the fiber in the right shape so that felting can proceed quickly.

Cap base

Cap ready for color

Here is the cap ready to have the color felted over the top. Pull out sheet like pieces of fiber just like you did for the stem. Completely cover the mushroom cap with the color you have chosen.

Cap with color

Cap ready to attach

Here is the cap ready to be attached to the stem.

Attaching the cap

Attaching the cap

Fan the loose fibers out at the top of the stem. Place the stem at the center of the mushroom cap. Needle the loose fibers in toward the center. Some of the fibers should pass through the stem into the cap. Try not to jab your needle all the way through the mushroom. When the loose fibers have been felted in nicely, turn the mushroom right side up and felt through the cap into the stem. Make sure that your needle is going directly from the cap into the stem. If your needle goes from the cap through air into the stem you will have trailing fibers of the cap color stretching over that space.

Mushroom before spots

Mushroom ready for spots

Here is the mushroom all ready for its spots.

Finished

All finished

Take a small amount of the stem color and rub it between your fingers into a rough circle. Felt the fiber onto the mushroom cap keeping the shape as round as possible. You can put as many or as few spots on your mushroom as you like. The sizes of the spots can be uniform or varied.

A kit with everything you need to complete this project is available here

https://www.etsy.com/listing/114119661/how-to-needle-felt-your-own-fantasy

Read Full Post »

On Friday last week, I had planned to work on a needle felting project. I went to my fiber supply and was quite dismayed to find that I didn’t have the color that I wanted to use. I had my heart set on purple, so the project got delayed while I did a dyeing day. I thought I would take the opportunity to share with you how I do it.

My alpaca fiber comes to me in large bags. It is often very dirty. When it arrives I open up a bag, spread the fleece out on a table and give it a quick once over to remove any large and obvious organic matter. I also give it a bit of a shake to remove loose dirt. It goes back into a clean bag until I am ready to use it.

I do all my dyeing in small batches. I wash and dye my fiber as part of one process. I use mainly alpaca fiber, but this process should work for pretty much any animal fiber.

fiber

Alpaca Fiber

First I take about an ounce of fiber. If you want consistent, repeatable results, you should actually weigh your fiber. I just eyeball it. I know about how much an ounce is, and I don’t need to repeat any color exactly. I spread it out and remove as much organic matter as I can.

Wash Prep

A squirt of dish detergent in hot water

Next I fill a bowl with hot tap water and swirl in a squirt of dish detergent. I use Dawn, but I don’t see why using another brand would make a difference. Add the soap after the bowl is full and swirl gently. You don’t want bubbles.

wash the fiber

Fiber in the Wash Water

Gently place the fiber into the wash water. Press down lightly to remove any air pockets. Let it set in the water for 20 minutes. Don’t poke it or push it around. I still always want to, but don’t do it. You should remove any organic matter that you see. Removing organic matter is an on going step through out the process. When the 20 minutes are up, gently slide the fiber into a colander and drain. Give it a rinse with the sprayer of your sink if you have one. If not, just a quick rinse under the tap should be fine. This step should be repeated as needed for the fiber to be clean. I did four washes with this particular batch.

When the fiber is clean, do a 20 minute soak in clear water. I follow that with a 20 minute soak in water with a splash of white vinegar. I feel that the vinegar helps brighten and soften the fiber a bit.

supplies

Dyeing Items

Here are some of the things I use when I am dyeing. Individual colors are done in the quart jars. Wide mouth jars make the process a bit easier, but you can really use whatever type jar you like. The tool on the left is for lifting the jars in and out of the hot water bath. The white bag is citric acid. I use it with the icing dye to set the color. It can be found with canning supplies in the store. The little bottle is a gel cake icing dye. Liquid food coloring may work(I haven’t tried it) but I imagine you would need a lot of it to get good color. The final item is unsweetened powdered drink mix. This one happens to be my store brand, but any type will work. I stock up when it is on sale.

Mixed dyes

Dyes Ready for Fiber-2 Black, Pink, Purple, Mixed Pink and Purple

The powdered drink mix is used alone when I dye. I use between one and four packages depending on the shade I want.

The cake icing dye is used with the citric acid. I use 1/2 a teaspoon of citric acid and about a 1/4 teaspoon of icing dye. Sometimes the icing dye gives interesting colors. Sometimes the colors in the dye separate out and give a nice variegated effect. I have not had good luck with reds. I get flecks of solid red instead of it dissolving well. Purple does not turn out to be purple in the end, but a streaky blue and pink(very cool, but not purple). The greens and yellows always turn out well. It is fun to experiment with the different colors. When I do black, I use a dark fiber instead of white.

After the colors are put in the jars, add hot (but not boiling) water to the jars to dissolve the dyes. I stir them with a chopstick until they are well dissolved.

Fiber in Dye

Fiber in the Jar Ready for the Water Bath

Place your cleaned, wet fiber into the jar. Push down gently with a chopstick to make sure the fiber is covered. This is another part where I always want to play with it, don’t do it. I put a bit more water in this jar before it went into the water bath.

Pot for Water Bath

Pot I Use for the Water Bath

The water for the water bath should be just a bit below boiling point.

 

Top View

Top View of the Water Bath

The water level should be just below the rim of the jars. The jars should remain in the water bath until all the dye has been absorbed and the water is clear. The pink and orange drink mix tend to have leave a milky look to the water. They never get completely clear for me, but everything else seems to.

Clear Water

The Fiber When Color is Absorbed

Remove the jars and allow them to cool.

I have to apologize for the quality of this photo. I couldn’t get a better one, but I wanted you to see how clear the water is. The chopstick is inside the jar holding the fiber to the side. As you can see, I still have some more organic matter to remove.

Salad Spinner

Into the Salad Spinner

When the jars have cooled, gently pour one into the colander portion of a salad spinner (brand doesn’t matter). They are pretty easy to find and inexpensive as well. Rinse the fiber gently. Then put the colander into the spinner and spin out as much water as you can.

Drying

On the Rack to Dry

Place the fiber on a rack to dry. Again, remove any organic matter that you see. I pretty much always have some fall out during the drying process.

I hand card my fiber when it is dry.

That’s how I do it. I am happy to answer questions that I can.

 

 

 

Read Full Post »